The Good and Bad of Asa

We are into a section now where there are parallel accounts of this history (Kings and Chronicles) and to get the full picture we have to compare and combine both. We read about Asa in 1 Kings 15 AND in 2 Chronicles 14-16.

King Asa of Judah was the grandson of Rehoboam, great-grandson of King Solomon.

THE GOOD: He was the first to make efforts to reform the sinful practices first introduced by Solomon (1 Kings 15:11-13).

THE BAD: How does Asa respond to a threat from Baasha king of Israel (1 Kings 15:16-22, especially verses 18 and 19)?

The treaty Asa made with Ben-Hadad of Syria is especially sad because of a stronger faith he had showed earlier in his reign which is recorded in 2 Chronicles 14:8-12. What was Asa’s attitude when threatened by the Ethiopians? (Especially verse 11)?

Following this victory Asa was encouraged by Azariah (2 Chronicles 15) which appears to have spurred him to perform the reformations for which he is well known (compare to 1 Kings 15:11-13 above).

It is AFTER this that Chronicles (2 Chronicles 16) tells us about the conflict with Israel and the treaty Asa made with Syria. Chronicles also tells us about how Asa is reprimanded by another prophet, Hanani (Verses 7-9). For what is he criticized?

How does Asa respond to this criticism? Recall from last week, how did Jeroboam respond to the criticism he received from the man of God regarding his altar and false religion? (1 Kings 13:4).

Read the conclusion Chronicles gives to the life of Asa. How did he once again demonstrate a lack of trust in God? (2 Chronicles 16:12).

What was the consequence of Asa’s reliance on Syria instead of relying on God? (2 Chronicles 16:7-9).

What are some events in our lives when we should rely on the Lord?

What is the proper attitude to have when we are rebuked by God’s word? (Proverbs 3:11-12).

Why is it difficult to classify a king like Asa as one of the good kings or one of the bad kings?

What does he teach us about being faithful to God the end of our lives?

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